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HOMING IN GUERNSEY, ALDERNEY & SARK

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GREYHOUND RESCUE JERSEY

Telephone: 01534 742619 Email: gailmalanddogs@hotmail.com

 

General & Medical Advice

Your greyhound will have been neutered or spayed when it arrives and also a flea and worm treatment administered. Worming and flea treatments need to be given every 3 - 4 months and you can obtain the necessary dosages from your vet.

EARS

Check regularly, and if a bit mucky, wipe with a wet cotton wool ball. If the ear looks inflammed or smells at all, this could indicate an infection. Once again consult your vet.

FEEDING

Many new owners already know how and what they wish to feed their dogs based on past experience. There are many products on the market but we find greyhounds do very well on the Burgess Complete Food - Supa Greyhound or Supa Sensitive. If your dog seems happy with this food and his stools are firm then you've cracked it. As with all dried foods, water nearby or indeed in the food is essential. Some dogs will like the food soaked, dry or half and half.

FEET AND NAILS

These have been very important to your greyhound while they have been racing and need continuing care from you. Pavement walking always helps but they will need to be clipped on a regular basis. If you don't have the confidence to do this yourself, ring us here at the Greyhound Sanctuary or alternatively your veterinary practice will be only to pleased to trim them.

SKIN AND COAT

Many greyhounds have bare patches, especially on the boney prominences or on their rumps. This is usually due to poor bedding, lying on concrete or stress. A condition known as 'bald thigh syndrome' and is common, due to the stress of racing. Sadly if this is the case, the fur may not return. You may also notice a few scars which will have been obtained during their racing career. The occasional bath and regular brushing should ensure that the coat keeps in good condition. A shampoo obtained from your vets would probably be best suited to your dog.

TEETH

Unfortunately due to a very soft diet in kennels, greyhounds teeth are not their best feature. Regular cleaning can help and special tooth paste can also be purchased from your vet. If you feel that they need attention, ask for veterinary advice.

TEMPERATURES

Unlike humans and other breeds of dog, greyhounds have a very low percentage of body fat in proportion to their size. There is, on the average, only 16% fat in a greyhounds body weight versus about 35% body weight for a comparably sized dog of another breed. This is why we supply both a lined winter coat and a mac which we ask you to use when the temperature drops. Although there are many beautiful styles and colours, contrary to belief, they are not a fashion accessory but very much a necessity. Their sensitivity to extreme temperatures may be obvious in cold weather but not so apparent in the heat, when they will pant and try and find cool places to lie. In this particular weather, leave your greyhound in peace as much as you can Cool flannels or towels placed on their bodies for just a couple of minutes can help, but do not leave them on for too long as the heat then becomes traps making things worse.

Try and walk your dog when it is cooler - first thing or later in the day.

Symptoms of heat stroke are distress, severe panting and collapse. If you think your greyhound is showing signs of this, cool your dog as fast as possible with cold water or apply ice to the head or back. If there is not an immediate improvement, obtain veternary help soonest.

NEVER LEAVE YOUR DOG IN A HOT ROOM OR CAR, THEY CAN DIE WITHIN A VERY SHORT PERIOD OF TIME

INSURANCE

Your dog will come with 6 weeks free Pet Plan insurance. it is up to you whether you continue with this. We strongly recommend that you have insurance, though you may choose an alternative company. Brochures are readily available at your vets or on the net, or give us a call for further advice.

 

G&M Hickmott2007