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GREYHOUND RESCUE JERSEY

Telephone: 01534 742619 Email: gailmalanddogs@hotmail.com

 

Socialisation

Greyhounds are the prototypical sighthound, a group of hounds that pursue their prey by sight rather than scent. As with all sighthounds, greyhounds have a very strongly developed chase instinct. In spite of this, it is possible for greyhounds to peacefully coexist with other pets including cats and dogs.

This racing instinct is based on a well-developed prey drive which is why a muzzle is always supplied to our new owners and we ask that you use it for the first few weeks or until you are sure that your dog is safe without it. Greyhounds are used to wearing this equipment and it is usually the new owners who find it strange but this allows you to approach other animals and test your dogs reactions safely.

People might have seen us out and wondered why some of our dogs are still muzzled - this is simply a sensible precaution when dealing with the number of dogs we have. As with any breed when you have more than two dogs you have a pack and pack instincts apply. Try and socialise your dog as much as possible, but be patient remember in most cases your greyhound will never have met any breed but his own.

If you are taking a greyhound home to meet a family cat, introduce them immediately with the dog muzzled. Hopefully the cat will let him know that he was there first and gain respect , but always be aware especially if the cat decides to run.

We ourselves have a few dogs that would not mix with certain breeds but this is a manageable situation. It is up to you to judge when or if your dog can go off the lead. You may even take your dog up to a training school just to let him know there are other breeds of dog. This is the same as you would do with a puppy only sadly these dogs do not get a puppyhood so it is all new to them.

Considering greyhounds lead a life whereby their main contact is with their own or their trainers, they seem to be especially good with children. In all cases interaction with any dog (not only greyhounds) and children, no matter how trustworthy either are, should be supervised.

Greyhounds are primarily a sprinting breed rather than an endurance one. They are happy with a minimum of two twenty minute walks a day but will take more. The rest of the time they are quite content to lie on your couch.

If you would like any of us from Greyhound Rescue to be with you the first time you allow your dog off the lead please do not hesitate to contact us, we shall be only too happy to accompany you. A few tasty treats in your pocket e.g. cheese or sausage is a very good idea to tempt your dog back.

Always make sure your dog has a house collar which he keeps on permanently with a name tag with your telephone number, address and the dogs name. This should also apply to the collar he wears to go out in, in fact it is illegal not to have this identification. You can obtain a disc from the Pet Cabin at Queens Road who make them up while you wait or you can order them from your vets or some other pet stores.

 

G&M Hickmott 2007